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Thread: Mark II – Engine woes

  1. #41 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
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    The continuing saga...
    I had a chance to run the engine up to temperature earlier this week. My optimism that the last cylinder would spring into life was misplaced. Dag nam it.

    So after some research I found that a screwdriver could be used as a sort of stethoscope and you can hear if the injector is working. Sure enough I could hear a metallic click on all injectors except number 4. A number of web sites suggest that tapping the injector with a screwdriver can free them up. I tapped it gently; nothing happened. I tapped a little harder then harder still. Eventually convinced myself that I could now hear the click but still no fuel was getting through.

    Next I managed to disconnect the connector and checked that it was working using my trusty LED. Using a connector from my spare loom I hooked up the rotten injector and checked the resistance: 14.5 ohms – spot on. I also read that the injector can be tested using a 9v battery. Some sites suggest only activating the coil for less than half a second to avoid burning it out. Others believe that at 9V the coil will never burn it out. I did not have a battery but using a bench power supply I tried activating it with 9v pulses. Nothing doing; so I gradually wound the voltage up to 12V. Still no fuel was getting through.

    I resigned myself to taking out the injectors. Drat and double drat! There are far too many backwards steps in making a car. My cunning plan to install the engine undisturbed is unravelling hideously.

    The injectors are angled towards each other like skew nails so it was a pain to take apart. As always Haynes had no suggestions as to how to make it easier.

    Having got the injectors out I made up a test rig. The rig allows me put a little petrol in a small reservoir and pressurise it using an old tyre valve and pump. Then using my trusty 9v supply I test fired them. By placing a clean sheet of paper under them I could check the spray pattern. 5 of them had had nice round patterns with number 5 having the widest and number 3 the narrowest.

    I still had no joy with number 4. So I gradually increased the pressure from 3 to 5.5 bar (80 psi).

    I pretty much decided that this patient was dead. With nothing to lose I decided to increase the voltage. Rather like one of those cardiac defibrillators on a medical drama. Shouting “clear”, I increased the voltage up to 20V. I made certain I was getting a good connection with a pulse of a couple of seconds; still no sign of life. I checked again the resistance which was still good. I guess the coils are more robust than people think.
    It is at this point I decided the injector has been dead for too long and the only thing left is a post mortem and burial.
    I have ordered up a replacement.

    The picture shows an injector firing in the test rig.
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  2. #42 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
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    ingenious! This thread is so interesting - sorry things arent working out well - but for us readers things are brilliant
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  3. #43 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
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    Engine woes are over!!!!!

    At least for now.

    The cheapest injectors I could find were a pair of new old stock on FleaBay. Slated to arrive Tuesday or Wednesday next week but surprised me by rocking up Saturday morning.
    I gave them a quick test and they did seem to flow about the same amount of fuel as the best of the old ones. So I replaced the worst of the old ones with the new pair giving me one working spare. A slightly better picture showing the new injector firing is attached.

    After reassembling the engine it fired up first time.

    A couple of my neighbours were out enjoying some afternoon tea in the sunshine. I am always a bit conscious of the fact that DIY can be a bit noisy and annoying so I thought I better wait for them to finish. They must have caught me peeping at them and came over to check my progress. They were quite insistent that give the engine a good test so I backed the car out and gave them the low down on my project. This allowed it to warm up for half an hour or so.

    At this point a lesser man might have backed the car out into our quiet close and had a little fun with it. But that would be illegal. I did manage to drive it up and down my short steep drive a few times and can report that the engine seems to be fine and has plenty of oomph.

    A triumphant day but I could have done without all this rework.

    Injectors seizing sometimes after just a few months seems to be quite a common problem. I mentioned that I used clean paper to check the spray pattern from the injectors. I am very surprised by the amount of residue left on the paper after the petrol has evaporated. A few years ago I had a lawn mower, which would not start, serviced. The mechanic blamed the lead substitute in modern fuels settling to the bottom of the tank. It seemed an unlikely cause. I have since heard it a few times since but put that down to it becoming an urban myth. This experience makes me wonder if there might be a problem with modern fuels. I think I might try to keep my tank fairly full when the car is going to stand for some time and be sure to fire it up at least once a month.

    My thanks to all who contributed. Special thanks to Phil C who furthermore gave me lots of useful information behind the scenes.
    Paul
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  4. #44 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
    club member Club Member andyf's Avatar
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    Have you put some fuel cleaner through it yet, if not it might be worth it. Did it to my son's yaris and it made it rum a lot smoother.
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  5. #45 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
    club member Club Member lil_red_roadster's Avatar
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    You can get injectors professionally cleaned.
    http://www.asnu.com/centres.htm
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  6. #46 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
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    Excerpt from a document here or there discussing the commercial storage of Ethanol fuels. Informative, and suggests that a car laid up for some time might suffer from layering of the fuel. An empty tank may be better than a full one.

    "Ethanol blends well with gasoline, but it also is completely miscible (mixable) in water. When water infiltrates a tank, (e.g., through sump covers and loose fittings at the top of the tank), the ethanol in the ethanol-gasoline blend will absorb the water, which, if enough is present, will overwhelm the ethanol’s ability to remain blended with the gasoline. Because it mixes easier with water than gasoline, the ethanol will be drawn from the gasoline into the water at the bottom, separating from the gasoline. The product in the tank is no longer a homogeneous blend of ethanol and gasoline, but two layers of product, a layer of gasoline on top and an ethanol layer on the bottom referred to as “phase separation.” Phase separation can be a problem for vehicles’ fuel lines and ignition system as the product is no longer an ethanol gasoline blend."
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  7. #47 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
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    Hi Andy,
    “Have you put some fuel cleaner through it yet,” – Not yet but a couple of people have told me they notice a difference. I think this might be something to do once the car has been IVA’d.

    Hi Jez,
    “You can get injectors professionally cleaned.” – I did spot that. The best seem to do some sort of ultrasonic cleaning combined with passing some sort of solvent through them. Some companies also assess the injectors spray pattern and match them in some way. I felt that it was really something for the boy racers amongst us trying to get the absolute maximum out of the engine. I decided I would be happy with an average sort of engine. I was pretty sure they were unlikely to do much with a stuck injector – other than sell me a new one. Now that the injectors are back in the engine there’s not much that will persuade me to take ‘em out again. The last sentence is one of those I always seem to regret later.

    Hi Steve,
    “Storage of Ethanol fuels... An empty tank may be better” – True; but: I recon the problem with my engine was that all the fuel had evaporated either leaving behind a sticky deposit or allowing corrosion to take place. If fuel evaporates at some fixed rate, let’s say 1 litre/month, if there are 2 litres in your tank there will be double the residue in your tank. If there are 100 litres the residue will only increase by 1%. Also in practical terms it is easier to top up the tank than drain it. I seem to remember something I heard in the ‘60s about full tanks having less surface area that restricts evaporation (sceptical about that claim). From what I have read the most important thing is to run the engine occasionally to keep the fuel flowing through the injectors. This should also keep the fuel rail topped up.

    I forgot to mention that one of my neighbours did own a Granada and confirmed that there was an engine light. So I think that solves the mystery of one wire, just one more to track down.
    Paul
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  8. #48 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
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    Now that I think about it my explanation of fuel evaporation is flawed. Darn it! You will probably get much more evaporation from a 100litres than from 2.
    Paul
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  9. #49 Re: Mark II – Engine woes 
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    I came across this
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