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Thread: Steering Wheel Alignment

  1. #1 Steering Wheel Alignment 
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    My steering wheel is slightly off centre, which has been anoying me for some time, so I decided to sort it and ordered a 34mm socket to remove the nut.

    The socket arrived to day and I duly removed the nut only to find the steering wheel boss appears to be welded in place.


    1.jpg


    2.jpg


    Which begs two questions:

    1. How am I supposed to centre the steering wheel?

    2. Why did whoever welded the boss in place bother to refit the nut and lock washer?
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  2. #2 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
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    Are you sure its welded? The boss is usually aluminium and you wouldn't be able to weld that to the steel steering column.
    In the pictures the finish looks just like a cast wheel boss.

    Assuming the wheel isn't hugely out of alignment you can adjust it by changing the tracking. That's is by screwing one track rod end in and the other out.

    But first I would double check the steering wheel boss to see if it is really welded. They can be very stubborn to remove sometime needing a puller.

    Cheers Robin
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  3. #3 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
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    There is no evidence of welds there. Like it has been said already that is aluminium and steel. I would suggest bearing pullers to pull on the wheel/boss and push on the column.
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  4. #4 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
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    I wonder if you removed all the screws and moved the wheel one hole ,would that make it right? BTW If you are trying to bang the boss off, put the nut back losely to avoid being smacked in the face!.
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  5. #5 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
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    Thanks all for the advice, I was trying to knock the boss off, but I'll try and get hold of some bearing pullers and give that a try.
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  6. #6 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
    frequent forum contributor Club Member b_caswell's Avatar
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    Put the nut back on loosely so you dont smack yourself in the face when it comes off.
    Ben Caswell probably not the last word on anything here!!
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  7. #7 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
    frequent forum contributor Club Member jon_cox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightsurfer View Post
    Thanks all for the advice, I was trying to knock the boss off, but I'll try and get hold of some bearing pullers and give that a try.
    Now might be a good time to make sure the steering system is in optimal position. Over time, adjustment of tracking and possible steering rack replacement can get things abit wayward. This can ultimately introduce bump steer.
    First thing to do is to centralise the steering rack, There is a hole in the steering racks outer which is found under either a piece of tape or circular cover thingy found in the middle of the rack. Some say this is also for filling rack with oil. You can use a drill bit of equal diameter to make sure that this hole lines up with one in the internal rack. This is the correct way of centralising everything. Now once this has been achieved, centralise the steering wheel. You now know that this is the correct straight ahead position for normal driving. This will position the steering rack knuckles / joints in the optimum position for minimal bump steer. Now you can adjust the track rod ends to make sure the track geometry is correct with the steering wheel in this new perfect straight ahead position.

    You will find the steering column spline is tapered, so if someone has been overzealous with tightening the nut then getting the wheel off can be lots of fun......
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  8. #8 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
    frequent forum contributor Club Member stevejgreen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon_cox View Post
    Now might be a good time to make sure the steering system is in optimal position. Over time, adjustment of tracking and possible steering rack replacement can get things abit wayward. This can ultimately introduce bump steer.
    First thing to do is to centralise the steering rack, There is a hole in the steering racks outer which is found under either a piece of tape or circular cover thingy found in the middle of the rack. Some say this is also for filling rack with oil. You can use a drill bit of equal diameter to make sure that this hole lines up with one in the internal rack. This is the correct way of centralising everything. Now once this has been achieved, centralise the steering wheel. You now know that this is the correct straight ahead position for normal driving. This will position the steering rack knuckles / joints in the optimum position for minimal bump steer. Now you can adjust the track rod ends to make sure the track geometry is correct with the steering wheel in this new perfect straight ahead position.

    You will find the steering column spline is tapered, so if someone has been overzealous with tightening the nut then getting the wheel off can be lots of fun......
    the part that gets ignored the most is the UJ at the very end of the column meets the steering rack. Ignored and exposed to the elements. A few drops of penetrating oil will help, but don’t turn it into a dirt magnet by using grease.. There is a standard boot that can be used to protect it, but I can’t find the part number.

    The one I fitted came from a Toyota MR2 if I remember rightly
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    The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.

    Loads of Marlin Reference can be found documents here or there.
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  9. #9 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
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    'Car builder Solutions' sell boots
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  10. #10 Re: Steering Wheel Alignment 
    frequent forum contributor Club Member stevejgreen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HairyDave View Post
    'Car builder Solutions' sell boots
    Wellingtons?

    Got a part number for the CBS boot, does it fit a Marina? The Toyota part fitted just fine for me.
    MOC member since 05/97
    1984 Marlin Roadster SWB.
    1800TC, Unleaded ported head, stage 2 cam. Ford Type 9 gearbox, Dolomite Sprint rear axle fitted with MGF disc brakes.
    Three core radiator, Renault Clio vented front discs.
    The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.

    Loads of Marlin Reference can be found documents here or there.
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