Click here to sign up  Click here to go to the galleries  Click here to go to the code of conduct  Click here to go to the video page  Click here to go to the SW Meets page
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild

  1. #11 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    184
    Robin , I think your welding is plenty good enough , the key is getting enough heat and therefore penetration into the joint.

    Overall though your axle casing looks very corroded. I restored mine and found a twisted knot attachment from Toolstation or Screwfix fitted to my 4" angle grinder, but stay away from the brake pipe retaining clips on the axle with that tool. I found
    worked well at removing the rust quickly . I then painted it with Red oxide primer and finally gloss black (Both were flag paints ).

    There has been no reoccurrence of any rust after 6 years. I only used that make paint ,as that is what Toolstation stocked at the time. I researched Flag paints and they make many marine application paints . So perhaps you may wish to check if purchasing Flag online compares with alternatives such as Rustoleum(Excellent) or Hammerite.
    Last edited by Ye Ol Ripper; 20-11-2021 at 10:40 AM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #12 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Bedfordshire
    Posts
    174
    Thanks for the kind words and advice guys.
    I have been over the axle a couple of times with various rust removers now, both physical and chemical, and probably the next step will be a high zinc primer - I have been using the Upol 182 stuff elsewhere. It's funny the brake pipe retaining tabs were mentioned. Mine were non-existant and I have had to weld on some new ones. Quite tricky welding thin stuff to thick stuff but in the end I successfully used what I think they call a plug weld.

    Another small update....

    A little bit of progress mainly due to the fact that IKEA seem to be out of stock of some of the components for our new kitchen! Which seems to prevent you ordering any of it....

    So - I trial fitted the rear springs and all the bits that the axle hangs on. Bit of a milestone this as it means I am actually starting to assemble the car rather than dismantle!
    Not quite as simple as it would first appear as the original U-Bolts and lowering block were shot so I had to get some replacements. Of course Marina ones are simply not available so in the end I used some Grayston lowering blocks and U-bolts intended for the Ford Escort. Actually better quality than I expected. I had to squish the u-bolts slightly as they were a few mm wider than the original ones. But they are made properly from HT steel, it seems, so I had to heat up the U bit to cherry red before they would move. They are also 1/16" greater in diameter so had to fettle the spring plates.
    The other good game was the rubber spring pads. Again originals unavailable. You can get them from one of the polybush companies but they are over £100 for the 4! In the end I modified some intended for an MGB. Cost me all of £6.
    axle5 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
    Cheers, Robin
    PS - The block of wood is the axle simulator...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #13 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    36
    Excellent work Robin - good to see the progress. Paul
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #14 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Bedfordshire
    Posts
    174
    I trial fitted the refurbished axle. It is very heavy! I have been pontificating about what dampers to use but Ebay had a special offer on Spax adjustables (20% off) so I spashed the cash and bought both rears and fronts (which are actually Herald rears).

    axle trial fit by Robin Martin, on Flickr

    The only real issue I had, prior to fitting, was the handbrake compensator lever which mounted using some long ago perished rubber top hat bushes. I managed to find an oilite bush of almost the correct size which was a tight press fit and used that instead. Probably better than the original.

    hand brake compensator by Robin Martin, on Flickr

    The only snag, and yet to be resolvled, is the proximity of the handbrake cables to the damper. I think it could well touch when the car is moving. Which probably wouldnt really matter but I guess it would be an MOT failure....

    hand brake cable by Robin Martin, on Flickr

    Next job is to remake the rear bulkhead - which I am going to make in steel rather than the original ally. That's going to be fun - folding 1.2mm zintec. Watch this space...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #15 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Bedfordshire
    Posts
    174
    After a lot of delays the zintec steel for my front and rear bulkheads arrived. I am making them from steel as opposed to the original alluminium for strength. The front bulkhead tends to crack arround the pedal box and the rear bulkhead has the seatbelts mounted to it. I was able to use my newly beefed up bender for the first time. As expected the folds are fairly soft but fine for the purpose.

    on_a_bender by Robin Martin, on Flickr

    rear_bulkhead2 by Robin Martin, on Flickr

    It fits considerably better than the original factory made effort - even if I do say so myself!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #16 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Bedfordshire
    Posts
    174
    I have made some good progress on replacing the front bulkhead. The original was rather tired and had a scary crack from pressure from the pedal box.
    cracked by Robin Martin, on Flickr
    I have made the replacement in steel, the same as the rear bulkhead. Proved to be quite tricky getting it right particularly at the bottom arround the chassis members. I have a couple of closing plates to still to fit there.
    The pedal box is also trial fitted. I have made a L & H shaped reinforcement from 25mm angle to help spread the load. The clutch pedal needs a little adjustment using the blowtorch and hammer it seems.
    The observant might notice there are 2 rows of fixings at the top rear of the bulkhead. The original design used the same fixings both to fix the scuttle (dashboard) moulding and secure the bulkhead to a chassis crossmember. I decided to make those seperate thereby improving the strength. I know the fixings are stainless, generally frowned upon for anything structural, but there are enough of them to well distribute any loads. On the final assembly I will also bond the bulkhead using a Sikaflex adhesive - same as I did on the Pembleton.
    front_bulkhead1 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
    front_bulkhead2 by Robin Martin, on Flickr

    Next job: overhaul the steering rack and decide on the position for the steering column. I want it under, rather than through, the dash as in the original design. The orginal Marina steering column is pretty shot so I am thinking of using one from a Triumph Spitfire for which you can still get things like bushes.

    Cheers for now, Robin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #17 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member jon_wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Macclesfield, Cheshire
    Posts
    434
    I had the pleasure of seeing this in the flesh, so to speak, earlier this week and can attest to the workmanship and attention to detail in the rebuild. Keep up the good work, Robin.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #18 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Bedfordshire
    Posts
    174
    I have almost (see below) completed the revised steering column arrangement. The column now exits at the bottom of the dash, instead of through it, and the steering wheel is angled at about the same inclination as the dash, instead of being almost vertical.

    The arrangement under the bonnet loooks a bit odd due to the fact that the steering rack is mounted so high in the Marina. But it gives me a nice angle between the lower and upper steering column which the SVA people would be delighted with. The idea is, in a front end crash, the upper steering column is not directed straight into the drivers chest! It should also miss all the engine ancilliaries, fingers crossed.
    steering_shaft by Robin Martin, on Flickr

    From the bulkhead backwards the steering column is mounted on some sturdy, and adjustable, brackets. I made the steering column itself using some Triumph bushes and an alluminium tube. And, yes, the brackets do use exhaust clamps, but after a lot of thinking they seemed the easiest and sturdiest way of mounting.
    steering_column3 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
    steering_column1 by Robin Martin, on Flickr

    I said almost completed.... I was very satisfied with the result until I offered up the pedal box and, despite carefull measuring, found the lower support bracket fouled the brake pedal. Grrrr - the air was a bit blue. Anyway, after sleeping on it I have come up with a slightly different bracket which should be fine. I'll post a picture when I have fabricated it. Which could be some time as my Ikea kitchen is due to arrive Tuesday. I have told the wife it's her Christmas present ;-)

    Cheers, Robin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #19 Re: DRL152K Marina based roadster rebuild 
    club member Club Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Bedfordshire
    Posts
    174
    I have made a little progress in between kitchen fitting. I have remade the lower steering column mount so it now clears the pedals. While I was at it I bent the clutch pedal so it is a more sensible distance from the brake pedal. (Perhaps the original builder had big feet!)
    steering_column5 by Robin Martin, on Flickr
    And it was pointed out to me that the angle that the steering UJ was running at seemed to exceed the 35deg recommended max. They were right! I have jiggled things a bit, mainly rotating the steering rack, and now the UJ is working within the 35deg. I could probably reduce the angle even further but I thought I would wait until a trial fit of the engine just in case I have to do any more rethinking of the steering shaft.
    revised_steering_shaft by Robin Martin, on Flickr
    Now back to the kitchen fitting.... It's too cold in the man shed anyway :-)
    Cheers, Robin
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •